World Policy Newsletter, Week of September 23rd

The Arctic Council at 20

The Arctic Council was created 20 years ago as a consensus-based forum for cooperation, coordination, and interaction between Arctic states and, significantly, with the participation of Arctic Indigenous communities. However, its founding principles alone obscure the complexity of lengthy negotiations that mark the day-to-day operations of the Council. World Policy Institute’s Arctic in Context initiative presents a series of expert assessments of the Arctic Council at this critical juncture.

Klaus Dodds analyzes a video produced to mark the occasion of the Arctic Council’s 20th anniversary, noting a lack of acknowledgment of the role of non-state actors in policy deliberations.

Rob Huebert explains that while the Arctic Council today represents a significant advancement in regional relations, security concerns threaten to undermine the cooperative spirit the forum has fostered.

Arctic in Context is pleased to launch “People of the North,” a series of interviews created in partnership with Kesserwan Arteau, a legal and consulting firm that works with indigenous communities. The series seeks to highlight the Arctic’s diversity from the perspective of those who live there. In this week’s installment, Jean François Arteau and Karina Kesserwan sit down with singer and activist Beatrice Deer to discuss her work developing the arts in Nunavik.


Around the Institute

On Wednesday, Sept. 28, World Policy Institute will host a panel discussion titled, “Trade Matters: Lessons from the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement and Prospects for TPP.” Free trade agreements, especially the Trans-Pacific Partnership, have emerged as major issues in the 2016 campaign. Donald Trump has expressed hostility toward the very idea of free trade, and Hillary Clinton has voiced opposition to TPP. This panel will feature Wendy Cutler, Matthew P. Goodman, and Gheewhan Kim, who were all intimately involved in negotiating these agreements and in advising U.S. and Korean leaders on trade issues.

This event is by invitation only. If you would like to attend invitation-only events, please consider a World Policy Membership today.


Fellow Updates

Jonathan Cristol appeared on Channel News Asia, discussing Ban Ki-moon’s final time addressing the U.N. General Assembly. He also spoke with VOA Persian about Saudi Arabia and the U.N.

Monique El-Faizy wrote in France 24 about a recent law in Egypt governing church construction and the appointment of a non-Muslim to run the Foundation for Islam in France.

William Hartung’s policy brief, “U.S. Arms Transfers to Saudi Arabia and the War in Yemen,” drew media attention from Reuters, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and more. Hartung’s recent articles in The Huffington Post include discussions of Donald Trump’s and Hillary Clinton’s plans for Pentagon spending.

William Powers was interviewed in South Africa's "Spotlight On" series about minimalism and sustainability. He will be speaking at Unity College, Maine on Thursday, Oct. 6.

Shaun Randol will host Nigerian writers Emmanuel Iduma and Chinelo Okparanta on Oct. 6 at Greenlight Bookstore in Brooklyn, NY, on the occasion of the publication of their novels. The Mantle is the publisher of Iduma's book, The Sound of Things to Come.

Masaru Tamamoto presented "Parsing the Idea of One Asia" at the One Asia workshop organized by Sheffield University in the U.K., Sept. 2-3.

Lissa Weinmann is curating and moderating a film series, “Understanding Cuba Through Film,” with the Windham World Affairs Council in Brattleboro, Vermont. The next film, a documentary about arts education in Cuba titled Unfinished Spaces, will be screened on Friday, Oct. 21.



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[Photo courtesy of U.S. Department of State]

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