World Policy Newsletter, Week of October 27th

Policymakers do not always take into account how their actions may adversely affect countries and communities. This week, our contributors examine the negative side of policy, from the migration rules keeping families apart to the environmental regulation that may determine the future of the Arctic’s Indigenous communities.

Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank, discusses why international actors should approach the African continent from an investment perspective, rather than solely in terms of development.

As the use of heavy fuel oil in the Arctic remains a subject of heated debate, former director of the Aleut International Association James Gamble emphasizes that a decision to phase out the fuel must consider the economic and social effects on Indigenous residents.

This week on World Policy On Air, we speak with journalist Ismail Einashe about the United Kingdom’s “minimum income requirement,” which prevents thousands of working-class British residents from bringing their spouses into the country.


World Policy Events

North Korea’s recent missile and nuclear tests have pushed East Asia to the front pages of newspapers across the country and around the world. Earlier this month, World Policy hosted “Arms and Allies: Security Cooperation in East Asia,” with a panel discussion featuring Hyun-Wook Kim of the Korea National Diplomatic Academy, Ankit Panda of The Diplomat, and Emilia Puma of the U.S. Air Force, moderated by World Policy fellow Jonathan Cristol and with welcome remarks from Gheewhan Kim, Consul General for the Republic of Korea in New York.

Read about the discussion here, and consider World Policy membership for access to our upcoming events.



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[Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force]

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