Trade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking

Trade Imbalance:
The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking
 
Please join the Global Policy Innovations Program at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs , Demos, World Policy Institute and Financial Times for a discussion with Susan Aaronson, co-author of Trade Imbalance:  The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking.
 
The discussion will be moderated by Shari Cohen, Demos Fellows Program Director, and Devin Stewart, Carnegie Council Global Policy Innovations Director. 
 
WHEN:          
Monday, December 10
3:00 PM-5:00 PM
 
WHERE:      
Global Policy Innovations
Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs   
170 East 64th Street
New York, New York                    
 
RSVP:              
This event is free and open to the public, but space is limited; registration is required to guarantee a seat.
 
To RSVP, email events@worldpolicy.org or leave your name, telephone and email address at the World Policy Institute’s Events line (212) 481-5005, Option 2.
 
About Trade Imbalance:  The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking:
 
Trade is controversial; around the world many people believe that trade agreements, even trade per se, undermines particular human rights such as labor rights or access to affordable medicine.  While some countries use trade policies to advance specific human rights such as property or labor rights, policymakers nevertheless struggle to achieve both goals.  In this book, authors Susan Aaronson and Jamie Zimmerman use stories about AIDS, frogs, chocolate, culture, tires and other topics to provide readers with new insights into this relationship.  Trade Imbalance also includes the first study of how South Africa, Brazil, the United States and the European Union make trade policy, coordinate trade and human rights objectives and resolve conflicts.  Aaronson and Zimmerman show how human rights issues are seeping into the WTO, and provide suggestions to policymakers for making their trade and human rights policies more coherent.    
 

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