Timeline

Timeline

The World Policy Institute’s oldest predecessor organization, the Association for Education in World Government, was founded in 1948. Its purposes included the “collection, study and analysis of ‘information and facts relating to international organizations and international law’ and the exploration and study of ‘proposed methods of achieving world government through the United Nations or otherwise.” In 1952, the organization changed its ... More
Harry B. Hollins and C. Douglas Dillon were also deeply interested in promoting a moderate internationalist mindset. (Hollins later founded WorldPaper –a special print supplement printed in multiple languages on five continents-- in Boston in 1978.) Dillon, chairman of the investment firm Dillon, Read and Co. from 1946-1953, was a moderate Republican who served under the Kennedy administration as Treasury Secretary and ... More
Throughout its history, the World Policy Institute has worked to promote creative solutions to global issues. As part of this effort, the Institute has turned to alternative means and ways of approaching the issues and the audience—namely, through art and media. As early as the 1960s, the Institute led the way in recognizing the importance of these mediums as a ... More
When the World Policy Institute was first founded, critics were quick to dismiss most of its programs for being “too idealistic” or “too ambitious.” As for the staff, they were just a bunch of “utopianists,” investing in an unrealistic hope for a better future. For the most part, it wasn’t that these critics disagreed with the Institute’s mission—they just didn’t ... More
The underlying philosophy of the World Order Models Project (known affectionately as WOMP), was that world peace could not be created by any one nation. Instead, an “acceptable design for world order [must] be the product of contributions from many nations.” Inspired by the insight of founder Harry Hollins, WOMP sought out new models of world order that would form ... More
When the World Law Fund was building its team of international scholars for the World Order Models Project (WOMP), its primary concern was representing all regions of the world in the creation of an analytic value framework. Then once this framework had been developed, they hoped to address the problems facing the world—primarily the presence of war—and propose sustainable solutions ... More
In 1971, the Grants Committee set up a two-year public education project called “Americans Talk Peacekeeping”, designed to publicize UN peacekeeping potential. The Institute also prepared materials for a series of nationwide workshops coordinated by the UN Association of the USA ... More
In 1972, the World Law Fund and its subsidiary programs merged with the Institute for International Order, adopting the name Institute for World Order. Harry Hollins of the World Law Fund took over the Presidency of the Institute from Earl Osborn. Hollins was succeeded by Franklin Wallin in 1973, and then by Saul Mendlovitz in 1974. Work in the 1970s included ... More
Before celebrities like Bono, George Clooney, and Angelina Jolie were serving as UN Ambassadors, informing the public of the troubles around the world, there were the Hubleys, Dizzy Gillespie, and the World Policy Institute. In 1964 and then again in 1973, the World Policy Institute brought together the Oscar award-winning directors and the Grammy award-winning musicians to educate the world ... More
In 1974, the World Policy Institute made headlines around the world with the report, “World Military and Social Expenditures.” Originally published as an annual report by the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), the World Military and Social Reports were discontinued in 1972. According to the then Secretary of Defense, Melvin Laird, these reports “contained misleading comparisons between military and social ... More
In 1975, WOMP sponsored the publication by participating scholars of a theoretical journal called Alternatives: A Journal for World Policy. WOMP also released a series of WOMP Occasional Papers and established three task forces on issues of global concern: Security, Disarmament and Human Rights; Science and Technology; and Global Culture ... More
In 1977, Rajni Kothari, Director of the Center for the Study of Developing Societies in India, joined Mendlovitz as Co-Director of WOMP. Some of these were summarized in a project book, On the Creation of a Just World Order. This was one of the first truly global think tanks, with partners and contributors in India, China, Africa and Europe. The results of ... More
In 1982, the organization formally became the World Policy Institute, changing its name to reflect its new policy focus. In 1983, Sherle Schwenninger founded World Policy Journal, together with Jerry Sanders and Robert Johansen, as a vehicle for disseminating ideas. Jerry Sanders was the first managing editor of the journal. The Institute also published a series of World Policy Papers through the ... More
But, perhaps a more notable example of the Institute’s media projects was the 1982 “Disarmament Video Survey,” which enlisted aspiring directors and filmmakers from around the world to interview individuals on issues of peace and disarmament. With over 3,000 interviews conducted during a massive 1982 rally in support of the UN Conference on Disarmament, variations of the film were produced ... More
In 1984, a five-year comprehensive program, called “The Security Project”, was launched by the Institute. Its opening statement, entitled “Political Choice,” had these prophetic, concluding paragraphs: “Freedom is inseparable from national security—freedom from costly and dangerous foreign adventures, and freedom to pursue a healthy, productive, and meaningful life at home. The enjoyment of the one is intimately linked to the avoidance of the other ... More
In 1991, WPI was absorbed into The New School for Social Research, at which time WOMP and its Alternatives journal separated from the Institute. James Chace became editor of World Policy Journal in 1993 and was succeeded in 2000 by Karl Meyer. Former Cuomo aide and UN official Stephen Schlesinger became director in 1997. Signature projects under his directorship were the Eurasia Stability Index ... More
As a result of the Journal’s influence, Jerry Sanders, Sherle Schwenninger and Walter Russell Mead were all invited to contribute to the Cuomo Commission reports on rebuilding the American economy. Sanders and Mead were key architects of the first report in 1988, and Schwenninger was the key architect of the international economic policy section of the second report in 1992 ... More
The Cuba Project sponsored a daylong conference in June 2000, “The Domestic Economic Impact of U.S. Unilateral Food and Medical Sanctions: Case Study Cuba.” More than 120 members of Congress and their staff and representatives from corporations, labor, and the media attended the conference in the Longworth House Office Building in Washington, hosted by then U.S. Senator John Ashcroft, who ... More
In the Fall 2000 issue, Karl Meyer explains that, "The U. S. Senate recently asked the Congressional Research Service to a carry out a review of the best articles on America's changing role in the post-Cold War era. The CRS selected 43 articles from the past six years it considered path breaking. Heading the list were nine contributions to World Policy ... More
New York Times journalist Chris Hedges writes, "Downtown, on the ninth floor of a building belonging to New School University, resides a small, obscure quarterly publication called The World Policy Journal, which has become one of the voices of dissent in how the United States carries out the war on terror abroad. The World Policy Journal has little of the ... More
On September 17, 2002, the World Policy Institute cosponsored the first National Summit on Cuba at the National Press Club in Washington. The National Summit brought together more than 380 national leaders and 48 speakers to explore how changes in U.S. policy toward Cuba could better serve our national interests. Bush administration representatives attended and spoke at the conference. On ... More
On October 4, 2003, the project organized another summit, the National Summit on Cuba: Florida Summit, which was held in Miami in conjunction with a consortium of Cuban American organizations in favor of increased dialogue with Cuba. Keynote speaker Mikhail Gorbachev came to Miami to support these moderate Cuban Americans, who view the embargo as impeding their ability to participate ... More
The 2004 National Summit on Cuba focused on Florida and the impact of renewed commercial ties between the United States and Cuba. More than 30 speakers presented including: U.S. Senator Larry Craig (R-Idaho); U.S. Representatives William Delahunt (D-MA), Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and Butch Otter (R-ID); (Ret) General John Sheehan, former Supreme Allied Commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) ... More
The last National Summit on Cuba was held in Mobile, Alabama on June 10, 2005 and presented diverse, nationally recognized speakers on current U.S.- Cuba commercial relations and policy. The Summit focused on the impact of the U.S.-Cuba estrangement on the American South and presented fresh data on past and potential future trade, we also educated our audience on the ... More
In 2007, the World Policy Institute and Journal split from The New School, re-incorporating as an independent 501c3 organization. WPI has strategic partnerships with think tanks and universities around the world, and in 2015 announced the launch of the World Policy Institute at Loyola Marymount University, an interdisciplinary think tank in Los Angeles that applies academic research to help solve ... More
The Panama Papers is the largest leak in history. At 2.6 terabytes, it’s on a scale never seen before—over 1,000-fold bigger than Wikileaks’ Cablegate scandal. The 11.5 million records from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca reveal an opaque system where billionaires, smugglers, and fraudsters hide their money for reasons both legitimate and criminal. So far, 12 current and former ... More

TIMELINE

The World Policy Institute’s oldest predecessor organization, the Association for Education in World Government, was founded in 1948. Its purposes included the “collection, study and analysis of ‘information and facts relating to international organizations and international law’ and the exploration and study of ‘proposed methods of achieving world government through the United Nations or otherwise.” In 1952, the organization changed its ... More
Harry B. Hollins and C. Douglas Dillon were also deeply interested in promoting a moderate internationalist mindset. (Hollins later founded WorldPaper –a special print supplement printed in multiple languages on five continents-- in Boston in 1978.) Dillon, chairman of the investment firm Dillon, Read and Co. from 1946-1953, was a moderate Republican who served under the Kennedy administration as Treasury Secretary and ... More
Throughout its history, the World Policy Institute has worked to promote creative solutions to global issues. As part of this effort, the Institute has turned to alternative means and ways of approaching the issues and the audience—namely, through art and media. As early as the 1960s, the Institute led the way in recognizing the importance of these mediums as a ... More
When the World Policy Institute was first founded, critics were quick to dismiss most of its programs for being “too idealistic” or “too ambitious.” As for the staff, they were just a bunch of “utopianists,” investing in an unrealistic hope for a better future. For the most part, it wasn’t that these critics disagreed with the Institute’s mission—they just didn’t ... More
The underlying philosophy of the World Order Models Project (known affectionately as WOMP), was that world peace could not be created by any one nation. Instead, an “acceptable design for world order [must] be the product of contributions from many nations.” Inspired by the insight of founder Harry Hollins, WOMP sought out new models of world order that would form ... More
When the World Law Fund was building its team of international scholars for the World Order Models Project (WOMP), its primary concern was representing all regions of the world in the creation of an analytic value framework. Then once this framework had been developed, they hoped to address the problems facing the world—primarily the presence of war—and propose sustainable solutions ... More
In 1971, the Grants Committee set up a two-year public education project called “Americans Talk Peacekeeping”, designed to publicize UN peacekeeping potential. The Institute also prepared materials for a series of nationwide workshops coordinated by the UN Association of the USA ... More
In 1972, the World Law Fund and its subsidiary programs merged with the Institute for International Order, adopting the name Institute for World Order. Harry Hollins of the World Law Fund took over the Presidency of the Institute from Earl Osborn. Hollins was succeeded by Franklin Wallin in 1973, and then by Saul Mendlovitz in 1974. Work in the 1970s included ... More
Before celebrities like Bono, George Clooney, and Angelina Jolie were serving as UN Ambassadors, informing the public of the troubles around the world, there were the Hubleys, Dizzy Gillespie, and the World Policy Institute. In 1964 and then again in 1973, the World Policy Institute brought together the Oscar award-winning directors and the Grammy award-winning musicians to educate the world ... More
In 1974, the World Policy Institute made headlines around the world with the report, “World Military and Social Expenditures.” Originally published as an annual report by the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), the World Military and Social Reports were discontinued in 1972. According to the then Secretary of Defense, Melvin Laird, these reports “contained misleading comparisons between military and social ... More
In 1975, WOMP sponsored the publication by participating scholars of a theoretical journal called Alternatives: A Journal for World Policy. WOMP also released a series of WOMP Occasional Papers and established three task forces on issues of global concern: Security, Disarmament and Human Rights; Science and Technology; and Global Culture ... More
In 1977, Rajni Kothari, Director of the Center for the Study of Developing Societies in India, joined Mendlovitz as Co-Director of WOMP. Some of these were summarized in a project book, On the Creation of a Just World Order. This was one of the first truly global think tanks, with partners and contributors in India, China, Africa and Europe. The results of ... More
In 1982, the organization formally became the World Policy Institute, changing its name to reflect its new policy focus. In 1983, Sherle Schwenninger founded World Policy Journal, together with Jerry Sanders and Robert Johansen, as a vehicle for disseminating ideas. Jerry Sanders was the first managing editor of the journal. The Institute also published a series of World Policy Papers through the ... More
But, perhaps a more notable example of the Institute’s media projects was the 1982 “Disarmament Video Survey,” which enlisted aspiring directors and filmmakers from around the world to interview individuals on issues of peace and disarmament. With over 3,000 interviews conducted during a massive 1982 rally in support of the UN Conference on Disarmament, variations of the film were produced ... More
In 1984, a five-year comprehensive program, called “The Security Project”, was launched by the Institute. Its opening statement, entitled “Political Choice,” had these prophetic, concluding paragraphs: “Freedom is inseparable from national security—freedom from costly and dangerous foreign adventures, and freedom to pursue a healthy, productive, and meaningful life at home. The enjoyment of the one is intimately linked to the avoidance of the other ... More
In 1991, WPI was absorbed into The New School for Social Research, at which time WOMP and its Alternatives journal separated from the Institute. James Chace became editor of World Policy Journal in 1993 and was succeeded in 2000 by Karl Meyer. Former Cuomo aide and UN official Stephen Schlesinger became director in 1997. Signature projects under his directorship were the Eurasia Stability Index ... More
As a result of the Journal’s influence, Jerry Sanders, Sherle Schwenninger and Walter Russell Mead were all invited to contribute to the Cuomo Commission reports on rebuilding the American economy. Sanders and Mead were key architects of the first report in 1988, and Schwenninger was the key architect of the international economic policy section of the second report in 1992 ... More
The Cuba Project sponsored a daylong conference in June 2000, “The Domestic Economic Impact of U.S. Unilateral Food and Medical Sanctions: Case Study Cuba.” More than 120 members of Congress and their staff and representatives from corporations, labor, and the media attended the conference in the Longworth House Office Building in Washington, hosted by then U.S. Senator John Ashcroft, who ... More
In the Fall 2000 issue, Karl Meyer explains that, "The U. S. Senate recently asked the Congressional Research Service to a carry out a review of the best articles on America's changing role in the post-Cold War era. The CRS selected 43 articles from the past six years it considered path breaking. Heading the list were nine contributions to World Policy ... More
New York Times journalist Chris Hedges writes, "Downtown, on the ninth floor of a building belonging to New School University, resides a small, obscure quarterly publication called The World Policy Journal, which has become one of the voices of dissent in how the United States carries out the war on terror abroad. The World Policy Journal has little of the ... More
On September 17, 2002, the World Policy Institute cosponsored the first National Summit on Cuba at the National Press Club in Washington. The National Summit brought together more than 380 national leaders and 48 speakers to explore how changes in U.S. policy toward Cuba could better serve our national interests. Bush administration representatives attended and spoke at the conference. On ... More
On October 4, 2003, the project organized another summit, the National Summit on Cuba: Florida Summit, which was held in Miami in conjunction with a consortium of Cuban American organizations in favor of increased dialogue with Cuba. Keynote speaker Mikhail Gorbachev came to Miami to support these moderate Cuban Americans, who view the embargo as impeding their ability to participate ... More
The 2004 National Summit on Cuba focused on Florida and the impact of renewed commercial ties between the United States and Cuba. More than 30 speakers presented including: U.S. Senator Larry Craig (R-Idaho); U.S. Representatives William Delahunt (D-MA), Jeff Flake (R-AZ) and Butch Otter (R-ID); (Ret) General John Sheehan, former Supreme Allied Commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) ... More
The last National Summit on Cuba was held in Mobile, Alabama on June 10, 2005 and presented diverse, nationally recognized speakers on current U.S.- Cuba commercial relations and policy. The Summit focused on the impact of the U.S.-Cuba estrangement on the American South and presented fresh data on past and potential future trade, we also educated our audience on the ... More
In 2007, the World Policy Institute and Journal split from The New School, re-incorporating as an independent 501c3 organization. WPI has strategic partnerships with think tanks and universities around the world, and in 2015 announced the launch of the World Policy Institute at Loyola Marymount University, an interdisciplinary think tank in Los Angeles that applies academic research to help solve ... More
The Panama Papers is the largest leak in history. At 2.6 terabytes, it’s on a scale never seen before—over 1,000-fold bigger than Wikileaks’ Cablegate scandal. The 11.5 million records from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca reveal an opaque system where billionaires, smugglers, and fraudsters hide their money for reasons both legitimate and criminal. So far, 12 current and former ... More